East Coast Hawaii

Hawaii (The Big Island), Hawaii, 24 February 2015

Hawaii, Landscape, Nature, Photography, seascape, The Big Island, Travel

This day we drove up the east coast of Hawaii in a guided tour very generously provided by Mark.  First we drove from where we were staying, along the coast to the south west corner of the island.  This is a place in the road where the trees grow overhead.

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Hawaii, Landscape, Nature, Photography, seascape, The Big Island, Travel Views along the south west coast.

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Hawaii, Landscape, Nature, Photography, seascape, The Big Island, Travel

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Hawaii, Landscape, Nature, Photography, seascape, The Big Island, Travel

This is Pohoiki Bay, with surfers waiting in the water.  There are places here where the sea water is warm from thermal activity.

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Hawaii, Landscape, Nature, Photography, seascape, The Big Island, Travel

A sacred pool at Pohoiki Bay.  If I remember correctly, it was only for the use of Hawaiian royalty.

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Hawaii, Landscape, Nature, Photography, seascape, The Big Island, Travel

This is a view from a scenic road north of the west coast town of Hilo.  Hilo was devastated by a tsunami from Chile in 1960, the same one that washed the Tongariki moai on Easter Island hundreds of kilometres inland.  Thirty foot waves hit the coast at Hilo (and presumably here) killing 61 people and causing the town to be rebuilt further inland.

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Hawaii, Landscape, Nature, Photography, seascape, The Big Island, Travel

Here we are further north along the west coast and have descended from the highway to the tiny coastal settlement of Laupahoehoe.  These are coconut palms where we parked the car.

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Hawaii, Landscape, Nature, Photography, seascape, The Big Island, Travel

Damaging tsunami have hit Hawaii in 1837, 1841, 1868, 1868, 1869, 1872, 1877, 1883, 1906, 1918, 1923, 1933, 1946, 1957, 1960 and 1975.  Laupahoehoe was inundated by one in 1946 that originated in the Aleutian Islands.  159 people died, mainly in Hilo but including 23 children and 4 teachers in Laupahoehoe.  There were three waves and the children were on the beach collecting fish left by the second wave when the third and largest wave hit, thirty metres high.  Only one teacher and two children survived.  This is near where the school was, close to the sea.  Residences and school buildings are now further from the sea.

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Hawaii, Landscape, Nature, Photography, seascape, The Big Island, Travel Looking north, along the coast.

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Hawaii, Landscape, Nature, Photography, seascape, The Big Island, Travel

Not everyone was greatly concerned by the prospect of tsunamis.

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Hawaii, Landscape, Nature, Photography, seascape, The Big Island, Travel

A couple of small birds were most indignant at interlopers they could see in car windows and mirrors.

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Hawaii, Landscape, Nature, Photography, seascape, The Big Island, Travel

They are Yellow-billed Cardinals, native to Brazil, Paraguay, Bolivia and Argentina.

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Hawaii, Landscape, Nature, Photography, seascape, The Big Island, Travel

Memorial and list of dead from the 1946 tsunami.

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Hawaii, Landscape, Nature, Photography, seascape, The Big Island, Travel

Finally, some views from the lookout overlooking Waipio Bay.

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Hawaii, Landscape, Nature, Photography, seascape, The Big Island, Travel

Getting to the lookout is one thing.  Going further down into the valley is another matter as there is a one-lane road suitable only for four-wheel drive vehicles.  It is an ancient sacred valley and was the headquarters of ali’i (or king) Umu, the first to rule over the whole island in the fourteenth century.

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Hawaii, Landscape, Nature, Photography, seascape, The Big Island, Travel

It is also a surfing location.

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Hawaii, Landscape, Nature, Photography, seascape, The Big Island, Travel

Here is a glimpse of life in Waipio Valley.  It was inundated in the 1946 tsunami when no lives were lost but ancient sites were destroyed.  The valley also went under four feet of water in a flood in 1979.  Today only around 50 people live there and visitors are not necessarily welcome.

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10 comments on “East Coast Hawaii

  1. What a fabulous post! Can’t wait to visit next year – thanks for posting. Some great spots to check it.

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  2. leecleland says:

    Nature at the edge of the ocean can be beautiful but also so deadly. Incredible stories behind such peaceful scenes.

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  3. […] his son Kiwala’o inherited the realm but Kamehameha received the Waipi’o Valley (see previous post) and guardianship of the God of War.  Later that year, just south of Kealakekua Bay, he defeated […]

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  4. Very good spelling Murray. Waipio’s black sand beach is worth the trip down.

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    • Murray Foote says:

      I’m careful with the spelling, Hattie, and it may help that I come from NZ so I have a feel for how Polynesian words are pronounced.

      Yes, it looked like a wonderful place to explore though not an option for us with a 2WD hire car.

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  5. […] East Coast Hawaii […]

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