Desert infrareds

24th February 2014 (Day 16) Manvar, Rajasthan, India

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These are a few infrared images that I took at Manvar Desert Camp.

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I wasn’t able to take many because it required me finding the time to use the tripod while others were merely using their cameras hand-held.

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There are trees and some vegetation over a sea of sand, with some people living in the area but it is still a desert, though since people live here, not actually wilderness.

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The exposure for all images was on a Fujifilm X-E2 and a 35mm f1.4 lens (equivalent to around 50mm), using an R72 filter.

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Getting to the final result requires processing which varies for each image.

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15 comments on “Desert infrareds

  1. Rajiv says:

    Do you shoot infrared with film? Or, digital? I must try this some day

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    • Murray Foote says:

      I used to shoot colour infrared film. Use a coloured filter or a combination of coloured filters and all the colours would change. Once I was shooting an aboriginal dance and I ran out of normal film so I switched to infrared. I sent it away for processing and they must have left the inspection port open on their processing machine because it came back with Sabbatier Effect, better than I was ever able to get trying deliberately. Quite remarkable, considering the subject matter.

      These images are digital, using an R72 filter which is almost opaque. The advantage with the Fujis is that they don’t have an anti-aliasing filter. I can compose on the EVF (or the optical finder with the X100s) and autofocus still works. Post-processing is a bit tricky, though.

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      • Rajiv says:

        I will try this. First, with film. Later in the year, Inshahallah, when I upgrade my camera, I shall buy the filters. Thanks very, very much for the tip!

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      • Murray Foote says:

        Black & white infrared film is quite different to colour. It tends to be quite grainy (though this can be good) and you have to load the film in complete darkness. Colour infrared film has three layers of which only one is infrared, red, green, infrared. Though I used to shoot colour, B&W might be a better place to start.

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      • Murray Foote says:

        Exposure can be a bit hit and miss with film because you can’t accurately meter infrared light.

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  2. Rajiv says:

    Freaking surreal photos, I might add!

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  3. Some very compelling imagery. Well worth the hassle of the tripod.

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  4. […] 24th:  Desert Infrareds […]

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  5. I agree with Rajiv – very surreal. And is it not amazing how much can grow in a desert. It is difficult to walk around the desert here and not tread on something that is growing.

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  6. […] Desert infrareds (6 infrared images in the Thar Desert, Rajasthan, India) […]

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