Delhi to Vrindavan

10th February 2014 (Day 2)

Delhi

Delhi

We undertook a long journey from Delhi to Vrindavan.  This gate in Delhi caught my eye as we went past on the bus.  It was only later when I looked more closely at the image on the computer that I was intrigued by the spelling error in the sign.  OK, most people in India are more comfortable in Hindi (or other non-English language) and it’s probably just a signwriter’s error but this is a University offering law courses in English and as well they offer “Management Coureses”.

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Delhi

Ready, set, go… (Delhi)

The traffic in Delhi is often a challenge.  Just as well I didn’t have to drive in it.

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Delhi

Delhi

Some modern sculptures in a park on the outskirts of Delhi.

This was taken from the bus, as for most of the images in this post.  Tricky at the best of times, with the opportunities usually very fleeting.  After this we got up to highway speed and it got just too hard until we reached Vrindavan.

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Vrindavan

Vrindavan

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Vrindavan

Vrindavan

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Vrindavan

Vrindavan

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Vrindavan

Vrindavan

For this image and the next two, we had stopped (I think for people to get some money from an ATM) and I was out of the bus and photographing from the street.

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Vrindavan

Vrindavan

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Vrindavan

Vrindavan

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Vrindavan

Vrindavan

In the background an old Hindu temple, Madan Mohan Temple, built in 1580.   In the foreground are people playing cricket and spectators.   On the pole is an advertisement for a new block of flats just outside town, somewhat bizarre in context.

This and the next three images flashed by as we travelled into Vrindavan on the bus.

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Vrindavan

Vrindavan

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Vrindavan

Vrindavan

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Vrindavan

Vrindavan

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8 comments on “Delhi to Vrindavan

  1. leecleland says:

    Exceptional seeing they were taken from a moving bus. Love the spelling mistake. What camera gear did you take on this trip? I interested if you travel light or take a range of lenses with you.

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    • Murray Foote says:

      I took a few lenses but I was travelling light, to be more suitable for the street in India.

      On the North Atlantic trip I took Nikon D800 and D3 with 14-24mm f2.8, 24mm f3.5 PC-E, 50mm f1.4, 85mm f1.4, 180mm f2.8, and 300mm f2.8 plus a 2x teleconverter for the 300mm. Also I had a Fujifilm X100s.

      On this trip I had a Fujifilm X-E2 with 14mm f2.8, 35mm f1.4 and 55-200mm f3.5-4.8, plus the X100s. That reduced camera and lens weight from 10kg to 2.4kg. I have a picture and description on the Itinerary page.

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      • leecleland says:

        Thanks for the reply. That is a huge reduction in weight for India! I’m going to Turkey and Morocco later this year and trying to work out what to take – not that I have as much choice as you do in cameras and lenses 🙂

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      • Murray Foote says:

        Assuming you are taking an interchangeable lens camera, most people favour zooms though I tend to favour primes. I would suggest taking at least one fast prime though to give you better capacity in low light.

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      • leecleland says:

        I did notice you had mainly primes and fast lenses. That is something I hadn’t understood (about low light) when I was buying my first lenses. It is a continual learning curve and am now saving for a faster and longer telephoto lens. I keep missing the wildlife 🙂

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      • Murray Foote says:

        Wildlife wasn’t really an objective on the India trip. When it was (North Atlantic, Antarctica, Japan) I took a full-frame camera and a 300mm f2.8 lens. This is a very expensive option and the lens itself weighs 3 kilos. Really serious wildlife photographers may say that 300mm isn’t long enough. Any choice is always a compromise. DSLRs have a significant advantage here, though. Phase-detect autofocus is much more responsive than the contrast-based or hybrid autofocus of mirrorless cameras. Mirrorless cameras are improving but it will be a couple of years before their autofocus is good enough for things such as birds in flight. Still, you can take good photographs with anything; you just have to work within the limitations of the equipment.

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      • leecleland says:

        I have just been to your itinerary page, thank you very informative. Can’t believe I haven’t been to your site before, I just get the posts as they come. That will change from now on 🙂

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