Wilson’s Promontory

Wilson’s Promontory, commonly called Wilson’s Prom, is the southernmost point of the Australian mainland.  I visited the lighthouse there on 24th and 25th April 1987.

Wilson's Prom in late afternoon 4:45am  24 April 1987 Arca-Swiss 5x4" monorail camera 240mm Schneider Xenar f11 1 second Fujichrome 50

Wilson’s Prom lighthouse in late afternoon
4:45pm, 24 April 1987
Arca-Swiss 5×4″ monorail camera
240mm Schneider Xenar
f11 1 second
Fujichrome 50

As an official visitor, I was able to drive as far as the end of the road, well past the point where most people have to walk.  It was just before sunset when I got there and this is the view from where I parked the car.  As you can see, there is still a fair distance to walk.

Building of the lighthouse was recommended in 1853 and construction commenced in 1857 using convict labour and locally sourced granite.  It was lit for the first time in 1859.  It is just under 20 metres high and sits nearly 120 metres above sea level.

Wilson's Prom  lighthouse staircase from below 8:00pm 24 April 1987 Nikon FE 16mm fisdheye Nikkor AI f3.5 6 minutes Fujichrome 50 (?)

Wilson’s Prom lighthouse staircase from below
8:00pm 24 April 1987
Nikon FE
16mm fisheye Nikkor AI
f3.5 6 minutes
Fujichrome 50 (?)

This is the lighthouse staircase seen from below at 8 o’clock at night.  There are two possible explanations here:  either the tower was bending over in a heavy wind or I was using a fisheye lens.  I’ll leave you to work out which it is.

View along road at Wilson's Prom.   7:00am 25th July 1987 (10 minutes after dawn),  Nagaoka Field Camera 5x4",  f22 2 seconds,  65mm Schneider Super Angulon,  Fujichrome 50.

View along road at Wilson’s Prom.
7:00am 25th July 1987 (10 minutes after dawn),
Nagaoka Field Camera 5×4″,
f22 2 seconds,
65mm Schneider Super Angulon,
Fujichrome 50.

Here is the lighthouse and cottages just after dawn.  There is a delightful little village atmosphere around the lighthouse.  Two of the four houses were burnt in a bushfire in the early 1950s and rebuilt.  Originally the lighthouse was painted white but if you visit it now it is unpainted, having been stripped back to the rock.  This process had just started at the time of this picture.  This is one of the lighthouses where you can now stay at a cottage though you have to walk 18km to get there.

Wilsons Prom view from top rail of lighthouse after dawn Nagaoka Field Camera 5x4",  150mm Linhof Schneider Technika Symmar,  f45 2 1/2 seconds + polariser,  Fujichrome 50.

Wilsons Prom view from top rail of lighthouse after dawn
7:15am 25 July 1987
Nagaoka Field Camera 5×4″,
150mm Linhof Schneider Technika Symmar,
f45 2 1/2 seconds + polariser,
Fujichrome 50.

After taking the previous shot of the lighthouses and cottages, I climbed to the top of the lighthouse and took this one looking along the coast to the west.

Wilsons Prom from lookout on walking track 11:00am 25 July 1987 Nagaoka Field Camera 5x4" 150mm Linhof Schneider Technika Symmar  f11 1/30 second + polariser  Fujichrome 50

Wilsons Prom from lookout on walking track
11:00am 25 July 1987
Nagaoka Field Camera 5×4″
150mm Linhof Schneider Technika Symmar
f11 1/30 second + polariser
Fujichrome 50

Here is a view of the lighthouse that I took when I was walking out.  The islands in the distance (behind and to the right of the lighthouse) must be East Moncoeur and West Moncoeur Islands.

When I was going through the image at 100% removing dust and debris deposited from inside the scanner, I saw something I hadn’t noticed before.  The image shows the landing and the crane that originally would have been the sole form of access to the lighthouse.  They are just above the cove which is in turn below the huge rock …

Wilson's Prom landing and crane (detail of previous image)

Wilson’s Prom landing and crane
(detail of previous image)

… as you see here.

One comment on “Wilson’s Promontory

  1. […] Wilsons Promontory (Vic) […]

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