Roaming with Dallas Frasca

16th to 18 March 2018, Northern Victoria, Australia.

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Fifty of us piled into a bus and headed off to various locations in Northern Victoria in A Hitch to the Sticks.  We were driving to three public musical events and there were also numerous “secret” gigs along the way, adding to the element of surprise and the enjoyment of the moment.  The idea was the brainchild of eminent musician Dallas Frasca.  It simulates the experience of a road crew touring on a bus, provides exposure to sometimes little-known regional performers and gives a great experience to all involved.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

This is our great friend Marisa Quigley.  She was performing at one of the secret events and I can’t tell you about that because there are to be more such events but since her name was on the poster I can include this image.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Sara Flint.

Sara and Mandy (below) were playing outside the Tatong Tavern.  This is a rather stylish looking pseudo-half-timbered pub which was closed to host the music and we were able to relax on the grass in the afternoon sun.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Mandy Connell.

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Click here for more images from Tatong Tavern, twelve in all, including Benny Williams and Time Robb & the Stealing Hours as well as Sara and Mandy.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Liv Cartledge.

Later in the afternoon we reached Wangaratta to join up with the Down to the River Festival, which stretched out into the night…

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

… while some people stretched out on the grass…

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

The Quick and the Dead.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Rambunctious.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Monique Brumby.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Tanya Cavanagh, playing with Monique Brumby.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Monique Brumby.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Maryanne Window, playing with Monique Brumby.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Dallas Frasca.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Venom and Jeff Curran, playing with Dallas Frasca.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Dallas Frasca.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Tully Frasca.

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Click here for more image from the Down to the River Festival, fifty-four in all.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Mikaylah and Leticia.

In the afternoon of the next day, we are out the back of the Moyhu Hotel.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Jeff Lang.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Nicky Bomba.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Crowd for Nicky Bomba.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Nicky Bomba and Jeff Lang.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Nicky Bomba.

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A Hitch to the Sticks, Australia, Blues Festivals, Dallas Frasca, Live Music, Photography, Travel, Victoria

Rick Steward and the Greensmen.

Click here for more images from the Mohyu Hotel, thirty-four in all.

I also have some monochrome conversions for your perusal, twenty-seven in all.  Some are from images in this post and some from different images.  Click here for those.

Alternatively, click here for all 129 images.

Lighthouse Monochromes – Victoria #2

1987, Victoria, Australia, From Dusk Till Dawn

 

Monochrome versions of lighthouse images from From Dusk Till Dawn . . ..

Most of these images were taken with large format 5×4 cameras using Fujichrome 50 slide film (Velvia did not exist then). A few were taken with medium format cameras Mamiya 645 and 1937 Rolleiflex TLR. Some (which should be easy to identify were taken with a Nikon FE and a 16mm fisheye lens.

Click links for posts on lighthouses with more information and colour images.

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Architecture, Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Loch Ard Gorge.

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Architecture, Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Gabo Island lighthouse pano from south.

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Architecture, Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

View of lens from top.

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Architecture, Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Point Hicks lighthouse, cottage and star trails.

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Architecture, Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Point Hicks lighthouse in early morning.

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Architecture, Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Point Hicks stairwell from below.

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Architecture, Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Pt Hicks Stairwell.

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Architecture, Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Point Hicks lighthouse at sunset.

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Architecture, Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

View through lens.

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Architecture, Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Point Hicks Stairwell from below.

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Architecture, Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

S.S. Saros, sunk 1937 and wrecked on the rocks.

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Architecture, Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Wilsons Prom from lookout on walking track.

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Architecture, Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

View along road at Wilson’s Prom.

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Architecture, Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Wilson’s Prom lighthouse staircase from below (fisheye lens).

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Architecture, Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Wilson’s Prom in late afternoon.

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Lighthouse Monochromes – Victoria #1

1987, Victoria, Australia, From Dusk Till Dawn

 

Monochrome versions of lighthouse images from From Dusk Till Dawn . ..

Most of these images were taken with large format 5×4 cameras using Fujichrome 50 slide film (Velvia did not exist then). A few were taken with medium format cameras Mamiya 645 and 1937 Rolleiflex TLR. Some (which should be easy to identify were taken with a Nikon FE and a 16mm fisheye lens.

Click links for posts on lighthouses with more information and colour images.

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Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Cape Nelson by night

(Degraded image, copy of print, original lost. I’ll have to try again sometime.)

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Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Cape Nelson lighthouse and wall.

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Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Cape Nelson shed and lighthouse.

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Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Cape Nelson at Dawn.

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Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Cape Nelson telescope hut.

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Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Cape Otway Lighthouse railings and view.

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Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Cape Otway Lighthouse view through lens.

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Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Cape Otway Lighthouse and reef.

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Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria .

Cape Schanck Pano.

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Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Cape Schanck door handle and latch.

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Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Cape Schanck Seascape in early morning.

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Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Cape Schanck Seascape Daytime.

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Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Cape Shanck Clockwork Mechanism.

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Australia, Black and White, History, Landscape, Lighthouses, Monochrome, Photography, seascape, Travel, Victoria

Cliffy Is from air.

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Cape Nelson

Cape Nelson lighthouse is on a headland in south-west Victoria only 50 kilometres from the South Australian border and about 20 kilometres west of Portland.  I was there around the 13th to 14th of May 1987.

Cape Nelson by night 6:30 to 10:30pm  2 May 1987 Arca-Swiss 5x4" monorail camera 90mm Linhof Angulon f6.8 4 hours Fujichrome 50

Cape Nelson by night
6:30 to 10:30pm
13 May 1987
Arca-Swiss 5×4″ monorail camera
90mm Linhof Angulon
f6.8 4 hours
Fujichrome 50

This is a four hour exposure by the light of the full moon.  I had set up the camera while there was still light, on a small platform over the edge of the cliff, and went away to have dinner.

One advantage of photographing lighthouses at night is the light from the lighthouse gives you something to focus on.  Long exposures with film are quite different to digital because as well as some colour shifts, reciprocity comes into play.  This means that the film no longer reacts in a linear manner to light and you have to give extra exposure to compensate.

This image is from a slide that the Department loaned out some years ago and is now missing but I was able to scan a print that I had made on Cibachrome in 1988.

The long streaks you see in the sky are star trails, including many fine ones.  On the horizon are both anchored ships and ships moving along the horizon.  Portland is not far away and the ships are probably loading aluminium from the aluminium smelter.  The air brush effect you see in the sea is not just the waves; it’s also the tide going in or out.

Cape Nelson at Dawn 7:20am  3 May 1987 Mamiya 645 f16 65 seconds + polariser plus f22 37 seconds + polariser (two exposures combined) Fujichrome 50

Cape Nelson at Dawn
7:15am
14 May 1987
Mamiya 645
f16 65 seconds + polariser plus f22 37 seconds + polariser (two exposures combined)
Fujichrome 50

This is the next morning, a few minutes before dawn.

Cape Nelson at Dawn 7:20am  3 May 1987 Arca-Swiss 5x4" monorail camera 90mm Linhof Angulon f16 12 seconds + polariser Fujichrome 50

Cape Nelson at Dawn
7:20am
14 May 1987
Arca-Swiss 5×4″ monorail camera
90mm Linhof Angulon
f16 12 seconds + polariser
Fujichrome 50

From a similar position, just a bit later.

Cape Nelson lighthouse was commissioned in 1884 and the cottages had been built two years earlier.  The delay was because they ran out of stone and had to find a different local source.  The lighthouse is 24 metres high and 75 metres above the sea.  Though building it was recommended much earlier, this only came about due to lobbying by Peter Lalor, former leader of the Eureka rebellion, who had become a prominent Victorian parliamentarian.

Cape Nelson lighthouse and wall Nikon FE 16mm fisheye Nikkor Fujichrome 50

Cape Nelson lighthouse and wall
14 May 1987
Nikon FE
16mm fisheye Nikkor
Fujichrome 50

Here is the path leading to the lighthouse and the adjacent wall, giving protection from wind in stormy conditions.

Cape Nelson shed and lighthouse 7:20am  3 May 1987 Arca-Swiss 5x4" monorail camera 90mm Linhof Angulon f22 1/4 second + polariser Fujichrome 50

Cape Nelson shed and lighthouse
7:20am
14 May 1987
Arca-Swiss 5×4″ monorail camera
90mm Linhof Angulon
f22 1/4 second + polariser
Fujichrome 50

A bit further away, a shed (original by the look of the stonework) and the lighthouse.

Cape Nelson telescope hut Nikon FE 16mm fisheye Nikkor Fujichrome 50

Cape Nelson telescope hut
14 May 1987
Nikon FE
16mm fisheye Nikkor
Fujichrome 50

The telescope hut on top of the cliff beside the lighthouse, where keepers could keep a lookout for ships in trouble without being distracted by the light.

Loch Ard Gorge

Loch Ard Gorge is about 50 kilometres west of Cape Otway along the Victorian coast and I visited there on the afternoon of 20 April 1987.

When I went to take an exposure from the vantage point there was no-one around.  I set up with my large tripod and monorail camera and was composing on the back of the ground glass screen underneath the dark cloth.  Even in 1987 it was pretty unusual to see someone using a camera that looked as though it came out of the nineteenth century.  When I emerged from under the dark cloth I found I had an audience of six to ten, quietly standing behind me watching me rather than the view.

I was here because this was the site of one of the most famous maritime disasters in Australia’s history.

Loch Ard Gorge 3:40pm 20 April 1987 Arca Swiss Monorail 5x4" 90mm Linhof Schneider Angulon f11 1/25 second (+ polariser?),  Fujichrome 50 (Low res scan from book)

Loch Ard Gorge
3:40pm 20 April 1987
Arca Swiss Monorail 5×4″
90mm Linhof Schneider Angulon
f11 1/25 second (+ polariser?),
Fujichrome 50
(Low res scan from book)

In the age of sail, sailing ships used the Great Circle Route to reach Australia.  This involved sailing from the Atlantic at latitudes below Tasmania to catch the brisk winds of the roaring forties.  Arriving quickly was an advantage because otherwise food stocks could run low.  The problem was that this meant they were coming up from the south onto a particularly dangerous stretch of coastline.

On 31 May 1878, the wool clipper Loch Ard was approaching this coast but a sea mist prevented using a sextant for a location fix and the captain thought he was some leagues to the south.  When the mist lifted at 4am they were off the cliffs and dropping two anchors did not prevent the ship grounding on a reef and then being dashed against the cliffs.  Fifty of the fifty-two passengers and crew went down with the ship.

Eighteen-year old Tom Pearce, a ship’s apprentice, was swept into the sea while he was helping to launch a boat. He managed to hold on underneath the upturned boat and eventually came into the shelter of Loch Ard Gorge.  Some time later eighteen year old Eva Carmichael, wearing a nightdress, a cork life belt and not much else, was also swept into the gorge clinging to a spar.  Two other people had been on the spar but were swept away shortly before.  Tom swam out to her and managed to bring her to shore after about an hour.  They spent the night together in a cave and the next day Tom climbed the cliffs to find help.  These days there is a wooden stairway so you can walk down there but climbing out without this was not a trivial matter.  There were steps cut into the cliff at the time but he did not find them.  At the top, Tom found horse hoof prints and then two stockmen, one of whom was George Ford, son of Henry Bayles Ford long-time keeper at Cape Otway.

One other curious survivor from the shipwreck was a rare Minton porcelain peacock, destined for the 1880 Melbourne Exhibition.  It washed ahore in its packing crate and must have been very well packed.  Two delicate vases also survived.

Eva’s father was ship’s doctor although the family was migrating to Australia at the time.  There were only six life belts on board and they went to the Carmichael family though only Eva survived.  She lost her father and mother, three sisters and two brothers.

Tom and Eva received a lot of media attention at the time.  On the one hand there was a romantic expectation that they should marry and on the other, Victorian attitudes suggested that she was compromised by sleeping in a cave with a young sailor and he really should offer to marry to make this right.

However, they then went on to lead quite different lives.  Eva returned to Ireland after some months and married a Captain Townshend.  I found a 1934 newspaper report of an interview with her in 1925.  Tom had proposed marriage to her but she turned him down, believing they had nothing in common.  After returning to Ireland she apparently lived on the coast of Ireland with her husband and were often called out to assist shipwrecked sailors.  One on occasion the person they assisted was Tom Pearce(!).  She had died shortly before the newspaper report, so probably in 1934 at the age of about 74.

Tom Pearce had previously survived another shipwreck when the Eliza Ramsden went down near the entrance to Port Phillip Bay (the harbour for Melbourne) in 1875.  Following the wreck of the Loch Ard, he was hailed as a hero and awarded a gold medal by the Royal Humane Society of Victoria as well as receiving £1000 from the Government of Victoria (a huge amount of money at the time).  After a few months, he went back to sea.  In 1879 he was in another ship of the Loch line that went down, the Loch Sunart, which hit a rock off Ballywalter in what is now Northern Ireland.  “The story goes that Tom Pearce was washed ashore and carried up in a senseless condition to the nearest house” which happened to be the house of Eva Townshend (née Carmichael).  This was less than a year after the Loch Ard disaster.

Tom married in 1884 and his wife was related to another ship’s apprentice who went down with the Loch Ard (Tom was one and there had been two more).  He later became a ship’s captain for the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, which had a monopoly on delivering mail by sea.  He retired in 1908 and died later that year at the age of 49.

According to a newspaper report at the time of the Loch Ard sinking, he was the son of Captain James Pearce, who went down with the steamship Gothenburg off the coast of Queensland in 1875.

There is also an historic painting showing Loch Ard and shipwreck debris just after the shipwreck.

Cape Otway

Cape Otway is on a headland south-west of Melbourne and is approximately north of the Cape Wickham lighthouse on King Island.  It safeguards one of the main maritime approaches to Melbourne.  I visited on 20 and 21 April 1987.

Cape Otway Lighthouse and reef 9:30am 20 April 1987 Arca-Swiss 5x4" monorail camera 240mm Schneider Xenar f11 1/30 second + polariser Fujichrome 50

Cape Otway Lighthouse and reef
9:30am 20 April 1987
Arca-Swiss 5×4″ monorail camera
240mm Schneider Xenar
f11 1/30 second + polariser
Fujichrome 50

Cape Otway lighthouse opened in 1848, when Victoria was still part of New South Wales.  There was a stiff formality in the early days.  In 1848 the second head keeper was told “When giving orders or instructions to the keepers you will at all times address them by their surnames and maintain the respect due to your situation by having them use the word Sir when replying to or addressing you.”

One of the early keepers, Henry Bales Ford, stayed at Cape Otway for thirty years, from 1848 to 1878.  In the early years supplies could be less than adequate and they were delivered every six to twelve months only.  Probably not surprising over a thirty year period, there were several instances of conflict between Ford and the lesser keepers.

The tower is eighteen metres high.  It did not need to be very high because it sits seventy metres above sea level.

Cape Otway Lighthouse railings and view 9:30am 20 April 1987 Nikon FE 16mm fisheye Nikkor Fujichrome 50

Cape Otway Lighthouse railings and view
9:30am 20 April 1987
Nikon FE
16mm fisheye Nikkor
Fujichrome 50

The railings and view.  This is really a bit of a warm-up exposure with not as compelling a composition as the following image, taken a few minutes later.  It’s taken on 35mm film rather than 5×4 sheet film and the process is a lot less deliberate.

Cape Otway Lighthouse railings and view 9:30am 20 April 1987 Nikon FE 16mm fisheye Nikkor Fujichrome 50

Cape Otway Lighthouse railings and view
9:30am 20 April 1987
Nikon FE
16mm fisheye Nikkor
Fujichrome 50

Just a lower viewpoint and adjustments in framing produces quite a different effect.

Cape Otway Lighthouse view through lens 9:30am 20 April 1987 Nikon FE 16mm fisheye Nikkor Fujichrome 50

Cape Otway Lighthouse view through lens
9:30am 20 April 1987
Nikon FE
16mm fisheye Nikkor
Fujichrome 50

A view through the lens showing a logical inconsistency that those who have read through the lighthouse posts should notice readily while those who have just come in to this post are unlikely to notice at all.

Worked it out?

Well, it’s upside down.  Like a lens in a camera (or the human eye for that matter) the lens of the lighthouse makes the outside world appear upside down and back-to-front so the image itself is upside-down to make the waves appear the right way up.

Cape Schanck

Cape Schanck is a lighthouse in Victoria, down below Melbourne at the end of the Mornington Peninsula. I visited there on 20 to 21 April 1987.

Cape Schanck Seascape in early morning 7:00am  21 April 1987 Arca-Swiss 5x4" monorail camera 65mm Schneider Super Angulon,  f32 2 1/2 minutes + polariser Fujichrome 50

Cape Schanck Seascape in early morning
7:00am
21 April 1987
Arca-Swiss 5×4″ monorail camera
65mm Schneider Super Angulon,
f32 2 1/2 minutes + polariser
Fujichrome 50

Though a lighthouse at Cape Schanck was originally recommended in 1841, building did not start until 1857 and it was started operation in 1859.  The lighthouse is 21 metres high and the plane of the light is 100 metres above the sea.

Cape Schanck Seascape in early morning 9:30am  21 April 1987 Arca-Swiss 5x4" monorail camera 90mm Linhof Angulon f8 5 or 10 seconds + polariser Fujichrome 50

Cape Schanck Seascape in early morning
9:30am
21 April 1987
Arca-Swiss 5×4″ monorail camera
90mm Linhof Angulon
f8 5 or 10 seconds + polariser
Fujichrome 50

The first image was taken in the early morning at the top of the cliff; the image above was taken somewhat later at the bottom.

Cape Schanck panorama Nagaoka 5x4" field camera with 6x9 roll film back 21 April 1987 150mm Linhof Technika Symmar f22 1/15 second Fujichrome 50

Cape Schanck panorama
Nagaoka 5×4″ field camera with 6×9 roll film back
10am to 11am 21 April 1987
150mm Linhof Technika Symmar
f22 1/15 second (two exposures combined)
Fujichrome 50

Here is a panoramic view of the lighthouse and cottages at Cape Schanck.

You will see the tall metal tower in the middle left.  Just a steel ladder with no safety features.  I decided to climb it for a sunset shot (with I think my smaller view camera).  Half-way up it was feeling increasingly precarious and it no longer seemed like a good idea to be juggling with camera, lens and exposure meter at the top.  So I came back down again.  The consequence was no sunset shot.

Cape Schanck door handle and latch Nagaoka 5x4" field camera 1:40pm 21 April 1987 150mm Linhof Technika Symmar f11 6 seconds Fujichrome 50

Cape Schanck door handle and latch
Nagaoka 5×4″ field camera
1:40pm 21 April 1987
150mm Linhof Technika Symmar
f11 6 seconds
Fujichrome 50

The Nagaoka field camera is visible in reflection in the brass plate and the door handle.  I am not there so I must have been taking the exposure with a cable release.

Cape Schanck Lantern Room 21 April 1987 Nikon FE 16mm fisheye nikkor f3.5 (partially defished) Fujichrome 50

Cape Schanck Lantern Room
21 April 1987
Nikon FE
16mm fisheye nikkor f3.5 (partially defished)
Fujichrome 50
(Low res scan from book)

Cape Shanck clockwork mechanism 5x4" camera Fujichrome 50

Cape Shanck clockwork mechanism
5×4″ camera
Fujichrome 50

Door handle, lantern room and clockwork mechanism.  The lantern room is unusual for its wood panelling.  The clockwork mechanism is in fully working condition though it has been functionally supplanted by a small electric motor.

Since Cape Schanck lighthouse is the closest one to Melbourne, it is a popular destination for visitors.