Museo del Templo Mayor

Mexico City, Mexico, 24 August 2016

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Wall of skulls.

In the previous post, we visited the remains of the Templo Mayor, the main temple of Tenochtitlan.  In this post we see some of the objects that archaeologists discovered during their excavations.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel .

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel .

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

I didn’t photograph the label for this one but I recall that thios recreates these objects as they were found.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel .

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel .

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel .

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Relief of Tlaltecuhtli.

This relief represents Earth god, Tlaltecuhtli, in its feminine version. The goddess has her back towards the front, with her head turned over and upside down, and she is in the natural squatting childbirth position. She has curly hair on her head, lipless mouth and a skull tied to her waist; in the joints (elbows and knees) she has faces shaped as claws, similar to the one on the knife coming out of her mouth.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel .

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel .

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel .

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Tlaloc Brazier.

This brazier represents God Tialoc with tears coming out of his eyes, showing the symbolic relationship of tears with rain. It is a faithful Aztec copy of braziers produced four centuries before by the Toltecs. The Aztecs frequently visited the ruins of Tula, abandoned around 1150 AD, to extract burials, offerings, sculptures and other traces of the religious buildings considered to be magic, since they were the work of the magnificent people of Quetzalcoatl.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Olmec Mask.

This piece shows the typical Olmec features and two perforations on the back side which probably were used to hang it up.  Its presence in the Templo Mayor shows the veneration which the Aztecs had for antiques, since the Olmec tradition flourished in Mesoamerica between 1200 BC and 400 BC.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Pot with an image.

This is an imitation of the plumbate ceramic of the Soconusco region, shared nowadays by the Mexican state of Chiapas and the Republic of Guatemala.  The face captured on the pot corresponds to an elderly person and possibly represents the god of fire, Xiuhtecuhtli.  The Aztecs may have taken it from Teotihuacan, a sacred city for them, where similar objects have been found.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Jade mask.  No label but I wnder whether it’s Mayan.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Eagle Warrior.

Natural sized ceramic sculpture representing an Eagle Warrior.  It retains remains of the stucco that covered it, simulating feathers of the authentic suits. The Eagle Warriors and the Jaguar Warriors were the two most important sections within the Aztec army.  The Eagles were associated with the Sun and the Jaguars with the Earth and night.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Mictlantecuhtli, God of Death.

Ceramic sculpture representing Mictläntecuhtli, God of Death, conceived by the Aztecs as a half-gaunt being in a position of attack, with claws and curly hair, probably placed using the holes he has in his head. The liver hangs under his
thorax, because according to Aztec beliefs, this internal organ was closely related with Mictlan or the Underworld, place where this deity resided.  One of a pair from the reign of Montezuma I (1440-1469 A.D.).  The Aztecs used to offer blood to them.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel .

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel .

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

This is not a small piece in a display cabinet, this is massive, covering the central area of the ground floor, taken looking down from the second floor (third floor for Americans).

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Tlaloc Pot’

Ceramic pot modeled with a high relief figurehead of Tialoc’s face, the god of rain. The Aztecs conceived it formed by two serpents intertwined at the nose and joining their heads face to face at the mouth. in this case, such serpents can be seen through the bands with vertical lines and alternate circles located over the eyebrows, eyes, nose, and around the mouth. It belongs to Stage IV (1440-1469 A.D.).

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel .

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel .

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Stage II Chacmool.

Replica of the original chac mool located in front of Tlaloc’s temple corresponding to Stage II of the Templo Mayor (1375- 1427 A.D). Most of its attributes were modeled in stucco or outlined with black, white, blue, red and ocher paint; in addition, a mass of tar was adhered to its face simulating a rough nose. The same attires and insignias distinguishing this sculpture are the ones the god of rain has in the native pictographs in the Central region of Mexico.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Puma.

The puma (puma concolor) is one of the big cats with wide distribution in what is currently the Mexican Republic. In the past it was even in the temperate forests surrounding the basin of Mexico.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Chicomecoatl.

This ceramic vase shows an image of Chicomecoatl, the goddess of ripe com and of maintenance in general, and is decorated in a Cholula polychrome style.  She is characteristically depicted as attired in red with corn cobs in her hands.  The cover of the vase shows Tlaloc, god of the rain, pouring water.

The vase contained numerous stone objects: over three thousand beads, figurines and a mask covering them, which presumably surround the vase. It  dates to 1469-1481 AD.

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Tenochtitlan Today

Mexico City, Mexico, 24 August 2016

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

A model of the Plaza Mayor and Templo Mayor in Tenochtitlan.  Behind it is an idealised painting by Luis Covarrubias (20th Century) of the cities of Tenochtitlan and Tlatelolco on the island on Lake Texcoco.  The model is more realistic than the painting.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Here we see a close-up of Templo Mayor.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

The temple was rebuilt seven times.  On each occasion, the old temple was completely covered in a casing of mud and stone, and a new temple constructed around it.  On five other occasions, only the main facade was expanded.  When each new building was opened, war captives from kingdoms conquered specifically the the event were sacrificed.

Also, the city suffered ongoing flood and earthquakes and the island subsoil was constantly settling, forcing them to raise the level of their pavements.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Some of it is still there.  This massive serpent must be as shown at bottom right in the previous image of the model.  it dates to the reign of Axayacatl (1469-1481)..

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Likewise, this is probably the serpent head from the lower middle of the model.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

After the fall of Tenochtitlan in 1521, two conquistadors, the Avila brothers, built houses on the ruins.  However, in 1566. they were arrested for conspiring against the Spanish Crown, along with Martin Cortes, the half-indigenous son of Hernan Cortes.  The Avila brothers were executed but Cortes was merely exiled to Spain.  The property remained abandoned for many years and was used as a rubbish dump.  Much later, it was granted to a University but construction never acrually happened.  Consequently, more survives than one might think, especially in the middle of a huge city.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

This chac mool, still showing some of its original colouring, lay outside the entrace to a shrine to Tlaloc, the rain god.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel .

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

The next few images data to around 1500AD.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Here you can see the different levels of pavement built up to counteract the sinking of the city.  This is of course a critical problem today, with the city subsiding 10 metres in the last century.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel .

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel .

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Banquette (bench) in the House of the Eagles.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Altar Tzompantli, alluding to Mictlampa, the region of the dead.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

Somewhat like Venice, building foundations were made by driving stakes into the lake bed or the surface of the island, secured by stone and mud.

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Archaeology, Aztecs, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan, Travel

The Cathedral is in the distance.

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Central Mexico City

Mexico City, Mexico, 22-24 August 2016

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Architecture, Art, Gran Hotel Cuidad de Mexico, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Arte, Palacio Nacional, Photography, Street photography, Travel

We were staying in the middle of Mexico City at the Gran Hotel Cuidad de Mexico (Grand Hotel of Mexico City) which is at the Zocalo, the central square of the city.  I was impressed by the French art nouveau styling and the stained glass canopy, created in 1908.

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Architecture, Art, Gran Hotel Cuidad de Mexico, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Arte, Palacio Nacional, Photography, Street photography, Travel .

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Architecture, Art, Gran Hotel Cuidad de Mexico, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Arte, Palacio Nacional, Photography, Street photography, Travel .

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Architecture, Art, Gran Hotel Cuidad de Mexico, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Arte, Palacio Nacional, Photography, Street photography, Travel

On our first night it was raining and this was a view from the end of a corridor near our room.

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The Catedral Metropolitana, at the north end of the square, through the rain.

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Architecture, Art, Gran Hotel Cuidad de Mexico, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Arte, Palacio Nacional, Photography, Street photography, Travel

After visiting Frida Kahlo’s house, we returned to the hotel and then set off for the Museo de Templo Mayor.  On the way, we walked across to the eastern side of the Zocalo and visited the Palacio Nacional.  It was originally the Palace of Montezuma II and Cortes rebuilt it as a fortress.  It was rebuilt again after it was burned in the Hunger Riots of 1692.  The Aztecs had a carefully planned system to divert spring water so that Tenochtitlan was surrounded by fresh spring water rather than turgid lake water.  That also made surrounding agricultural land highly productive.  The Spanish understood none of this and destroyed the canal system, undermining the local environment and ultimately leading to the hunger riots.

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This is Diego Rivera’s grand mural of Mexican history around the main staircase. You may need to click on it to see the detail, which includes representations of Frida Kahlo, Karl Marx and John D Rockefeller in the left panel.

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Architecture, Art, Gran Hotel Cuidad de Mexico, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Arte, Palacio Nacional, Photography, Street photography, Travel .

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Architecture, Art, Gran Hotel Cuidad de Mexico, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Arte, Palacio Nacional, Photography, Street photography, Travel .

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Architecture, Art, Gran Hotel Cuidad de Mexico, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Arte, Palacio Nacional, Photography, Street photography, Travel

More murals by Diego Rivera, showing the pre-Columbian era and post-conquest.

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Architecture, Art, Gran Hotel Cuidad de Mexico, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Arte, Palacio Nacional, Photography, Street photography, Travel

This series of murals was never finished.

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Architecture, Art, Gran Hotel Cuidad de Mexico, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Arte, Palacio Nacional, Photography, Street photography, Travel

An internal courtyard showing the scale of the building.

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Architecture, Art, Gran Hotel Cuidad de Mexico, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Arte, Palacio Nacional, Photography, Street photography, Travel

From the Palacio Nacional we walked through the colourful streets of Mexico City towards the Museo de Templo Mayor.

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Architecture, Art, Gran Hotel Cuidad de Mexico, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Arte, Palacio Nacional, Photography, Street photography, Travel .

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Architecture, Art, Gran Hotel Cuidad de Mexico, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Arte, Palacio Nacional, Photography, Street photography, Travel .

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Architecture, Art, Gran Hotel Cuidad de Mexico, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Arte, Palacio Nacional, Photography, Street photography, Travel .

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Architecture, Art, Gran Hotel Cuidad de Mexico, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Arte, Palacio Nacional, Photography, Street photography, Travel

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Architecture, Art, Gran Hotel Cuidad de Mexico, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Arte, Palacio Nacional, Photography, Street photography, Travel

(The remains of the main temple of Tenochtitlan (the Templo Mayor) and our visit to the Museo de Templo Mayor follow in the next two posts).

 

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Architecture, Art, Gran Hotel Cuidad de Mexico, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Museo Nacional de Arte, Palacio Nacional, Photography, Street photography, Travel

In the morning of our last day in Mexico City, we had time to visit the Museo Nacional de Arte.  You look up at this in the main hall.

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Looking up in one of the staircases, you see this much older spectacle.

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Frida Kahlo’s House

Mexico City, Mexico, 24 August 2016

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Frida Kahlo (self-portrait).

I presume that everyone reading this knows who Frida Kahlo was, but if you don’t or would like more information, have a look at this brief online biography.

These images are from a visit to the house that Frida grew up in, lived in for many years with Diego Rivera and died in.  It is now a museum.

..Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Puppet theatre near the front door.

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Painting by Diego Rivera.

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Frida Kahlo.

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Bedroom of Leon Trotsky during his exile in Mexico and of Diego Rivera towards the end of his life in the house.

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Dining room.

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Same view, but a wider angle with a fisheye lens.

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Staircase to the upper floor and recess with family portraits.

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Frida’s Studio.

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Frida’s bedroom.

An image I saw showed butterflies on the wall.  Perhaps they were removed because they were not there while she was alive.

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Toys of Frida’s infancy.

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Courtyard garden.

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Extension designed by Diego Rivera.

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Pyramid displaying pre-Hispanic pieces.

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Dresses that she wore.

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Jewellery and clothing items.

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Dresses.

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Undergarments.

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Apparatus to hold her together.  She had polio at 6, suffered lielong severe back injury from a traffic accident when she was 18 and had a leg amputated due to gangrene a year before she died.

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Poem by Patti Smith.  Perhaps difficult for some to read so it goes:

Naguchi’s Butterflies

I can not walk

I can not see

further than what

is in front of me

I lay on my back

yet I do not cry

transported in space

by the butterflies.

 

Above my bed

Another sky

with the wings you sent

Within my sight

all pain dissolves

In another light

Transported thru

Time

by the butterfly

 

This little song came to me

like a little gift as I stood

beside the bed of Frida.

I give it to you

with much love,

Patti Smith

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Architecture, Art, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, History, Mexico, Mexico City, Photography, Travel

Meso-American assemblage in the courtyard.

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Pebble Island Homestead

2nd to 3rd November 2015. Pebble Island, Falkland Islands.

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Falkland Islands, History, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, seascape, Travel

This is a distant view of the Pebble Island Homestead, as we return on the late afternoon of the 2nd.

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In the late afternoon light, and it might have been a spring tide, these South American Terns were diving for some marine food source in the waves…

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Falkland Islands, History, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, seascape, Travel .

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Falkland Islands, History, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, seascape, Travel

Next morning I was due to fly out and I got up early, I think before breakfast, to photograph the old farm buildings.  There is very little farm activity going on these days and little explanation required of these images.

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Falkland Islands, History, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, seascape, Travel .

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Falkland Islands, History, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, seascape, Travel .

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Falkland Islands, History, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, seascape, Travel .

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Falkland Islands, History, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, seascape, Travel .

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Trivial milestone:  I estimate that with this post there are 10,000 images in this blog.  In a couple of posts, if you printed all those images out on A4 paper and stretched them end to end, they would make three kilometres of prints.  There are also over 260,000 words, enough for a 575 page book even without the images.

Note:  Posts may slow down for the next few weeks.  I will be working on images from the Thredbo Blues Festival 2017 and though I have a few Falklands posts ready, I have yet to start on South Georgia.
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Wreckage from the Falklands War

2nd November 2015. Pebble Island, Falkland Islands.

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Falkland Islands, Falklands War, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, Travel

Two Argentinian planes were shot down over Pebble Island during the Falklands War.  This is from IAI Daggar C-437 in which Lt Hector Volponi died, shot down by the Harrier of Lt Martin Hale on 23rd May 1982.  There appears to be a partially released parachute here.  Lt Volponi’s body was found on the ground in a cone section of the plane.

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Falkland Islands, Falklands War, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, Travel

This is one of the fuel tanks of the C-437.  There were two under the wing and one under the body.

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Falkland Islands, Falklands War, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, Travel

Probably part of another fuel tank.

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Falkland Islands, Falklands War, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, Travel

The Falklands was first settled by the French in 1764 and the British in 1766 and they may have been unaware of each other’s settlements.  France transferred its claim to Spain in 1766.  The British withdrew their settlement in 1774 and the Spanish in 1812.  The British returned in 1833 and the Falklands Islands became a crown colony in 1840.  Britain was looking to transfer the islands to Argentina in the 1970s but this was blocked by fierce opposition from the islanders.  The early Thatcher Government also looked to transfer the islands as a needless expense but was blocked by the islanders.

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Falkland Islands, Falklands War, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, Travel

Argentina occupied the Falkland Islands on 2 April 1982, partly to distract internal opinion from poor economic results and the political repression.

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Falkland Islands, Falklands War, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, Travel

Early in the war, Argentina established a small airfield at Pebble Island to help defend against British ships.  The SAS raided Pebble Island on the 14th May and destroyed all the planes.

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The war was a stretch for both sides.  Britain could have lost, either due to more successful raids of the Super Etendards on their main ships, or more effective bombing of the landing at San Carlos.  The Argentines military planning was for a war with Chile and they were stretched to cover the Falklands.  They couldn’t use the Stanley airfield for their jets and the Falklands was near the limit of their range from the mainland.

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Falkland Islands, Falklands War, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, Travel .

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Falkland Islands, Falklands War, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, Travel

Remaining images are of the other plane, the C430 IAI Daggar.  The pilot, Captain Diaz, successfully ejected just before the crash and though he was seriously injured, survived the war.
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Falkland Islands, Falklands War, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, Travel

He was flying in formation with two other Daggars when they were all shot down on the 24th May by a Harrier flown by Edmund Spencer.  One of those pilots died.  The other ejected parallel to the sea, was uninjured when his ejection seat bounced along the water, and swam six hours to the shore.

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Falkland Islands, Falklands War, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, Travel

The IAI Daggars were an unauthorised Israeli copy of a French Mirage 5 aircraft.

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Falkland Islands, Falklands War, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, Travel

Here is a forward section of the fuselage showing that aircraft shot down was the C-430.

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Falkland Islands, Falklands War, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, Travel

Here is a model of the very aircraft by Pablo Calcaterra.  He has a useful page showing the history of these planes in the war.  I sent an email requesting use of this image but the email addressed bounced.  So I hope he is OK with me using his image here.

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Falkland Islands, Falklands War, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, Travel

Here is a photograph of the actual plane, shortly before taking off on its final mission, also from Pablo Calcaterra’s site.

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Falkland Islands, Falklands War, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, Travel

The pilot was of course not in the plane when it hit the ground but he was also injured before ejection.

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Falkland Islands, Falklands War, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, Travel

There is a Forum thread here, which includes an account by the British pilot that shot down this plane.

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Falkland Islands, Falklands War, Landscape, Nature, Pebble Island, Photography, Travel

On the 25th May, the British Destroyer Coventry was off the north coast of Pebble Island in an operation to distract the Agrentinians from the landing at San Carlos Bay.  They shot down two Argentinian Skyhawks and both pilots were killed, but bombs from another two Skyhawks sunk the Coventry, killing 19 of her 189 crew.  While the survivors waited in their lifecraft to be rescued, they sang “Always look on the bright side of life” from Monty Python’s Life of Brian.

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